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Ludovico Mazzolino

c. 1480 - 1528 ?

Place Born

Ferrara

Place Died

Ferrara

Bio

Mazzolino began his studies with his father Giovanni. Towards the end of the fifteenth century he probably moved to Bologna, to complete his training in the workshop of Lorenzo Costa. The young Mazzolino’s talent must already have been apparent for by 1504 a document records the first payment for his work in the chapels of the new church of S. Maria degli Angeli, Ferrara, now destroyed. Mazzolino’s earliest surviving work was considered to be his dated triptych of 1509 now in Berlin. However, some scholars have recently identified in a Presentation of Christ in the Temple – previously attributed to an anonymous Ferrarese-Bolognese painter – as an early Mazzolino work dating from the first years of the sixteenth century. This addition to Mazzolino’s oeuvre highlights the strong ties that must have existed between the artist and the Ercole de Roberti atelier. Boccaccio Boccaccino, who is documented as working in Ferrara between 1497 and 1500 was of equal importance in influencing the young Mazzolino and it is probably through him that he first approached the revolutionary innovations of Giorgione. Mazzolino, however, seems to have been much more attracted to the northern culture evident in the esoteric circle of Jacopo de’ Barbari and Lorenzo Lotto rather than to a Giorgionesque entourage . Mazzolino, probably became aware of Durer’s engravings through this circle since the German master had visited Venice as early as 1495, again in 1505, and travelled to Bologna in 1512-13, almost certainly passing through Ferrara. This composite poetic and pictorial world led Mazzolino to develop a highly grotesque and unrealistic manner, which finds a close parallel in the output of his contemporary, the Bolognese painter; Amico Aspertini.

Towards the second decade of the sixteenth century, Mazzolino, like Garofalo, became increasingly aware of Raphaelesque classicism and seems to have absorbed something of Dosso Dossi ‘s manner. During these years, he probably travelled to Rome, as various direct quotations from ancient marble reliefs seem to testify. These new influences led him to conceive such chaotic masterpieces as the The Massacre of the Innocents, (Rome, Galleria Doria Pamphili) and The Crossing of the Red Sea of 1521 (Dublin, National Gallery of Ireland).

Like his contemporary Ortolano, Mazzolino died some time during the third decade of the sixteenth century, a victim of the plague that at the time was rife in Ferrara.

Art Works Sold

Christ and St Stephen

Sold or not Available
Historical Period: 1450-1530 High Renaissance to Mannerism and 1530-1600 Mannerism & Cinquecento
Christ and St Stephen
The Pietà

Sold or not Available
Historical Period: 1450-1530 High Renaissance to Mannerism and 1530-1600 Mannerism & Cinquecento
The Pietà